Soul Food Junkies

The term Soul Food is used to refer to ethnic cookery that is traditionally prepared and eaten by most black Americans living in the Southern United States. The cooking style of soul food originated from slavery, where slaves were left with leftovers cuts of meat from their masters. The film “soul food junkies” by Byron Hurt explores soul food tradition revealing how it is a mark of cultural identity among African Americans. To most people, the recipe is some sort of ritual or sacrament that continues to be popular in spite of its dangers of high calories and fats.

We get to know that soul food brings people together and builds strong family bonds from the film. The speaker talks of how sharing a Sunday morning meal with his father brought them together (Hurt). Food is emotional as it goes beyond comfort and love. It is about justice- food justice affects those with or without proper access to fresh food. The speaker explains the multicultural revolution that is taking place in communities across the country. Food systems have been industrialized by corporate structures. We all ought to have access to a healthy life which requires awareness across lines of class, color, and a revolution.

The movie is an eye-opener on how African Americans poison themselves through their diet. We see how the author of the ‘Soul Food Junkies’ lost his father as a result of pancreatic cancer, a disease that brought forth the type of food he ate. Soul food continues to be consumed by lower-income communities because they lack alternative health food. According to Byron, it is promising how communities are trying to emulate healthier lifestyles despite the unfavorable system in which they live. 

Works Cited

Soul Food Junkies. Directed by Byron Hurt, 2012.