Movie Analysis Essay: The Hate U Give

Some discrepancy is always expected in a movie that is adapted from a book. The main reason for this in most cases is because films try to be more appealing. They spice up scenes a little extra. The hate U Give was not exempted from this. Angie Thomas’s novel is a narration of a young African American girl forced to make hard decisions after witnessing a police officer gun down her friend. Despite the slight difference between the novel and the movie, they all managed to bring out the theme of racial tension.

Although Chris (Starr’s boyfriend) is present in the book and the movie, the argument after the condom thing is very brief in the film. In the book, there is a prolonged dispute. In the movie, there is a slightly uncomfortable talk of ‘I don’t see color,’ but this sentiment only appears towards the end of the book (Fletcher). Also, the food that Chris is questioned about in the movie is pumpkin pie versus sweet potato pie, but in the novel, it is green bean casserole. Another difference between Angie’s work and the film is on significance attached to the characters. For instance, according to the movie, Mr. Lewis was an owner of a Barbershop and only noticed the presence of Seven and Starr when the premise is on fire. However, in the book, he is a compelling character that plays more significant roles. He witnesses an ambush on a police car and comes to a news crew live on TV to speak on the incident. In the movie, Mr. Lewis is a minor character that has no much impact on the plot. In the film, Khalil shares a kiss with Starr before he is murdered. In the novel, there is sexual tension between them, but it does not escalate to kissing. In both instances, Starr knew that Khalil was a drug dealer (Fletcher). However, in the book, reasons for him to venture into such a dangerous activity are not revealed until maybe towards the end. Khalil’s mother owned King, and to protect her, he had to work for the drug gang.

The movie was subtle in how it portrayed the police and maintained riots at PG13. Presumably, the director did this to make the cinema friendly to screen at age unrestricted movie theatres. There is almost no cursing or use of vulgar language when talking of the police, which is not the case when it comes to writing the narration. In the book, there are several paragraphs where Starr and Seven curse the police.

The most significant adjustment from the novel is the ending. The movie ends at a stand-off between Mav, King, and the police. The audience is left in suspense, questioning whether the Sekani will shoot King and, if so, what course of action the police will take. But in the book King and his crew are loitering around and laughing about the fire when the firefighters and police come over. Mav, Mr. Lewis, and residents of the community affirm that King is responsible for the fire, which leads to the police arresting him. Despite the difference between the movie and book, their firm stance in portraying racial tension remains. There is racism, as people of color are mistreated and reside in low-standard neighborhoods.

Works Cited

Fletcher, Rosie. “The Hate U Give: Differences Between the Book and the Film.” Den of Geek, 23 Oct. 2018, www.denofgeek.com/uk/movies/the-hate-u-give/60645/the-hate-u-give-differences-between-the-book-and-the-film. Accessed 14 Nov. 2019.

This Post Has 3 Comments

Leave a Reply