Kants ideals on the categorical imperative and morals according to the twenty-first-century

Topic:

Kants ideals on the categorical imperative and morals according to the twenty-first-century

Paper details:


I have laid out my plan. It’s not great and if it can be improved please do. I am going to attach the files of the readings I am going to use and the plan that I have sent my teacher. I left it open for changes that you may need to make. Feel free to take some freedom on this. I am a progressive thinker. Also if you miss it in my plan I am choosing scenario #3.

Here are the links to the YouTube videos we watched and links to readings.

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB4FE9C3FD95130E6

https://youtu.be/Yntk1Zi6iC4

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000wlf4

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0952zl3

In the final paper I’ll expect you to find some topic in our course readings that interests you. If you send me some possible topics that interest you, then I can help you narrow them down.

The purpose of a philosophy paper is to make an argument. This argument can go a few different ways…

Scenario #1: Writers have disagreed about my topic, and my paper explains why one side in the debate has been more convincing than the other(s).

Scenario #2: Writers have disagreed about my topic, and my paper demonstrates why the entire debate is wrong and needs to be recast in a more meaningful direction.

Scenario #3: Writers have agreed about my topic, and my paper argues for a different, better, or more nuanced interpretation that others have missed.

(‘writers’ here could be other scholars or simply your classmates)



First, your paper must start with a summary of what you’re dealing with (what is the argument, what are its key assumptions and terms, etc.). Clarity is highly valued in philosophical writing. Writers should get right to the point rather than writing an elaborate introduction. A dry sentence like, “In this paper, I will…” is absolutely fine. Make sure your reader (me) understands your plan for your paper. Don’t take anything for granted.

Then you have options…

You might find a weak point in the argument. You can object to it, and then either provide a solution or an
alternative argument.

Or maybe you build upon the original argument with your own steps to come to a different conclusion (without disrupting the original argument).

In any approach, it is good to consider possible objections to your own points. Why would anyone disagree with you? What possible counterarguments could someone make to your position? Try to refute them in some way by showing that they are irrelevant, misguided, or otherwise fail to discredit your argument.

A conclusion in your paper is not necessary unless you want to draw my attention to the main points again. If you made your argument well, then I won’t need a conclusion to remember it.

There are thousands of resources on Google to help write philosophy papers, but I am more than happy to answer questions you have during the writing process.

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