Field Trip about Getty Museum

The J. Paul Getty Museum located at the Getty Centre in Los Angeles is a place that arouses interest about and creates room for the enjoyment and interpretation of visual arts.  At the center are found an assortment of paintings, and 19th- and 20th-century American and  European photography,  drawings,  illuminated manuscripts and  sculpture from Europe that have been gathered from different parts of the world.  

London calling is one of the most fascinating exhibitions at the Getty centre. It displays the work of six British artists who essentially turned focus from abstract expressionism to figurative painting namely: Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon, Leon Kossoff, Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, and R.B. Kitaj shortly after the Second World War.

Bacon’s piece is a portrait of Isabel Rawsthorne while Kossoff’s painting is a swimming pool in an urban setting and cathedral like structures with monet-like impressions in an autumn afternoon. Kitaj‘s piece includes text and collage, some of which resembles German Expressionism (Wyatt). However, the late self-portrait with his wife exhibits a daunting impression of alone together, none like any other seen in figurative art. Freud’s is a drawing that depicts a boy smoking that the image arouses intense emotions. 

Then there is Melanie and Me Swimming by Andrews which show a young man and a girl floating in a spring as they hold hands. Auerbach uses impasto which brings out an encrusted and colorful depiction of what appears to be town houses. There are many artists that have successfully brought out figurative art but as would be the opinion of most others that have seen this exhibition, London Calling is a piece that is all but perfect.

Works Cited

Wyatt, Edward. “Gauguin – Arii Matamoe – J. Paul Getty Museum – Art – The New York Times.” The New York Times – Breaking News, World News & Multimedia, 12 Mar. 2008, www.nytimes.com/2008/03/12/arts/design/12gett.html. Accessed 6 Dec. 2016.